Products
Services
Research Areas
COVID-19
Resources
Contact Us
Distributors
Login
Quick Order
Cart
Login
Registration enables users to use special features of this website, such as past
order histories, retained contact details for faster checkout, review submissions, and special promotions.


Fields marked with a * are required.

Login
Quick Order
Services
Immunohistochemistry Services

Work with LifeSpan to design a custom immunohistochemistry to address your specific biological question. Outsource the entire localization process without having to worry about finding and characterizing target specific antibodies, sourcing and validating difficult-to-find tissues, and having the ability to interpret the resulting immunostaining in relation to complex human pathologies.

TCR Screening Services

Test your therapeutic antibodies in immunohistochemistry against a broad panel of normal frozen human tissue types in order to determine potential unintended binding. Our non-GLP TCR services are designed on the FDA recommendation outlined in their "Points to Consider in the Manufacture and Testing of Monoclonal Antibody Products for Human Use".

Contact Us
LSBio
2401 Fourth Avenue Suite 900
Seattle WA 98121
Phone:
866-819-4732 (Toll Free North America
206-374-1102 (International)
Fax:
866-206-6909 (Toll Free North America)
206-577-4565 (International)
How To Buy - Details about how to buy our products.
Orders@LSBio.com - To submit a new order.
Customer.Support@LSBio.com - To submit questions about existing orders, pricing, availability, bulk quotes, Proforma invoice requests, or other billing issues.
Technical.Support@LSBio.com - To request technical information about an LSBio product or its applications
Sales@LSBio.com - To request information about fee-for-service contract IHC studies, IHC reports, distribution agreements, or general business development.
Worldwide Distributors List - To find your local distributor if you're not within the United States.
Login
Registration enables users to use special features of this website, such as past
order histories, retained contact details for faster checkout, review submissions, and special promotions.


Fields marked with a * are required.

Login
Quick Order
Home > Virology

Virology Research Products

Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that contain either an RNA or DNA genome. They are classified on the basis of morphology, chemical composition, and mode of replication. The viruses that infect humans represent only a narrow slice of the wide variety that infect hosts from protozoa to plants, fungi, bacteria, and vertebrates, but are responsible for causing many human and animal diseases. LSBio offers antibodies, proteins, ELISA kits, assay kits, and chemical compounds used by researchers to study and develop diagnostics and therapeutics for major viral diseases.

Coronaviridae (COVID-19)

Coronaviridae (COVID-19)

Polyomaviridae (SV40)

Polyomaviridae (SV40)

Hepatitis Viruses

Hepatitis Viruses

Paramyxoviridae (Mumps)

Paramyxoviridae (Mumps)

Herpesviridae (Herpes)

Herpesviridae (Herpes)

Pneumoviridae (RSV)

Pneumoviridae (RSV)

Orthomyxoviridae (Influenza)

Orthomyxoviridae (Influenza)

Retroviridae (HIV)

Retroviridae (HIV)

Papillomaviridae (HPV)

Papillomaviridae (HPV)

Togaviridae (Measles)

Togaviridae (Measles)

Back To Top

DNA versus RNA Viruses

Viruses are initially grouped on the type of genetic material, RNA or DNA. RNA virus genomes can be double stranded, positive single stranded, or negative single stranded, whereas DNA virus genomes can be single stranded, linear double stranded, or circular double stranded. Positive stranded ssRNA genomes can be directly translated into protein by the host, while negative stranded ssRNA genomes must be converted to a positive strand by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase before translation. Retroviruses have RNA genomes and use reverse transcriptase to generate a DNA intermediate during replication, which is integrated into the host genome and transcribed back into RNA.

DNA viral genomes can be large, encoding hundreds of viral proteins, whereas RNA viruses usually encode only a few proteins. DNA viruses have lower mutation rates due to the editing functions of the DNA polymerase and some are capable of integrating into the genomes of the host cell. RNA viruses undergo frequent mutation, enabling them to diversify to escape host immune mechanisms. Both DNA and RNA viruses manipulate a broad number of host cellular processes by interacting with host proteins involved in the cell cycle, transcription, nuclear transport, viral processing, packaging, and virion release.


References
  • Reference: Durmus, S and Ulgen, KO. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses. (2017) FEBS Open Bio 7(1): 96-107. doi: 10.1002/2211-5463.12167